Tag Archives: Health

Heads Up: Illinois healthcare practitioners should pay attention to the incidence of the purchase and use of non-FDA-approved medications from foreign countries

State and federal agencies are investigating and prosecuting the acquisition and distribution of non-FDA-approved medications.

State and federal agencies are investigating and prosecuting the acquisition and distribution of non-FDA-approved medications.

Healthcare practitioners should be aware of recent investigations and prosecutions for the purchase and distribution of non-FDA-approved narcotics from outside the U.S. Recent reports of U.S. Federal Drug Administration (“FDA”) activity puts a spotlight on not only the civil and criminal penalties at stake, but also the safety of patients. Concerned physicians and health care administrators and staff should be aware and vigilant against even unintentional acquisition of prohibited narcotics. Negligence is not a defense to liability for breaking these laws. Healthcare practitioners and professionals risk the suspension and loss of their licenses in connection with prescription drugs coming from foreign countries.

State and federal agencies are investigating and prosecuting the acquisition and distribution of non-FDA-approved medications.

A currently circulating news story is catching the attention of healthcare practitioners targeted by foreign supplies of medications not approved by the FDA. The Physician’s Practice website recently published an article focused on importing foreign prescription drugs[i]. The FDA’s focus on doctors who thought they purchased Avastin, a cancer drug, from an online Canadian pharmacy. The imported medication was fake and, “contained cornstarch and acetone, but no active cancer fighting ingredients,” the article reports. “Patients who received the false medication did not receive the cancer-fighting medications they truly required.”

Doctors, hospital administrators and staff should all be concerned about the risks of foreign prescriptions. The civil and criminal penalties are strict and professionals’ licenses are on the line for violations of the laws involved. While a doctor may save up to 50 percent on the cost of a medically equivalent drug from Canada or Ireland, making that purchase can lead to a drug trafficking conviction.

The importation of non-FDA-approved drugs is a violation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”) which is enforced by the FDA. The FDA can prosecute a first offense of importing a non-FDA-approved drug resulting in either or both a year in prison and up to a $1,000 fine; a second offense can earn a three year sentence and up to $10,000 fine.[ii]

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (“IDFPR”) can suspend or revoke a professional license to practice for violations of the FDCA.

The Illinois Medical Practice Act of 1987 (“MPA”)[iii] sets for the law concerning the activity of licensed healthcare practitioners. The mission of the IDFPR is, “To serve, safeguard, and promote the public welfare by ensuring that licensure qualifications and standards for professional practice are properly evaluated, accurately applied and vigorously enforced.[iv]” The IDFPR can suspend or revoke a professional’s license for violations of the MPA. On their website, the division published a news release with helpful information, How the Division Responds to a Request for an Investigation of a Physician.

Being proactive and vigilant with everyone involved is a best practice to protect against foreign drugs.

Doctors and their administration and staff should be made aware of the risks of overseas prescription medication sales and the consequences for violations of state and federal laws. It may be helpful to identify the online and offline sellers attempting to lure in American purchasers with the promise of big savings and more. Being proactive and educating healthcare professionals about the risks and penalties of purchasing non-FDA-approved drugs from overseas is a recommended practice.

For more information about professional licensing and what to do upon receiving notice of a complaint, you may review 10 Short Tips for Responding to an IDFPR Investigation. You may also contact an attorney at Michael V. Favia & Associates for more information.

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to help and meet for client consultations with offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburbs so you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.

[i] PhysiciansPractice.com, blog, Big Consequences for Doctors Importing Prescription Drugs, Feb. 6, 2013, by Ericka L. Adler.

[ii] See article HNi above.

[iii] Illinois General Assembly, Medical Practice Act of 1987, 225 ILCS 60/1 et seq.

[iv] IDFPR News Release, How the Division Responds to a Request for an Investigation of a Physician. Aug 2005.

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Neglect and abuse: when the nurse steals the patient narcotics

State agencies including the IDFPR work together to keep Illinois residents safe.

State agencies including the IDFPR work together to keep Illinois residents safe.

On the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (“IDFPR”) regulates the licensing of Illinois Nurses. In the news recently, one Illinois nurse faces felony drug and neglect charges. On the IDFPR website, using the license lookup feature, Nichole Banuelos, is indicated as disciplined by having her Licensed Practical Nurse (“LPN”) license suspended as of August 29, 2014, “for having diverted controlled substances for personal use from her employees.” The terms of discipline are described on the IDFPR site, which states the following about suspensions: “Professionals whose licenses have been suspended cannot practice during the period of suspension. The term of suspension can range from one day to indefinite. In many instances, the period of suspension is followed by probation.”

Illinois nurse is caught taking patient drugs when she is found asleep at a medicine cart.

On Saturday, June 28, 2014, Mascoutah police in southwestern Illinois near St. Louis arrested Banuelos on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance.[i] Investigations by IDFPR led to allegations in the complaint against Banuelos, that she had fallen asleep at a medicine cart and was diverting narcotics from patients at the rehabilitation and nursing center where she worked. It was alleged Banuelos took Ritalin, Hydrocodone, Atropine, Morphine, Ambien and Ativan from patients. She was fired the same day. Investigations also led to the discovery at another medical facility, that Banuelos failed to feed a patient and failed to give the patient their medication.[ii] She was fired three days later.

Theft of narcotics is a serious problem in the healthcare industry. There are many news reports of nurses and hospital staff with access to narcotics who take them for personal use of for sale on the lucrative black market. The victims, often nursing home and rehabilitation patients, with a wide range of injuries and illness and when they do not receive their prescribed medications, suffer in pain and discomfort at the very least. With the potential for abuse, medication mismanagement and  theft are a top concern of healthcare administrations and the state agencies overseeing their professionals.

State agencies including the IDFPR work together to keep Illinois residents safe.

When a complaint is filed by the IDFPR against an Illinois nurse, the individual must first answer the complaint before an administrative law judge who makes a recommendation to the Illinois Nursing Board, which also makes a recommendation to the IDFPR.

If an individual becomes aware of the wrongdoing of a licensed professional, they may file a complaint with the IDFPR. Here is an IDFPR website link that shares more detail on reporting complaints. Complaints are investigated by the IDFPR but not all reported complaints lead to professional discipline. Michael Favia publishes a link with 10 short tips for responding to an IDFPR investigation.

If you are interested in learning more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, serving Chicago and its suburban communities, please visit the Favia Law Firm website for resources and articles of interest. To contact the firm to speak to a lawyer about a healthcare-related concern, you may dial (773) 631-4580. For more information about the firm’s practice areas, you can also visit the firm’s Facebook and Twitter sites. Please “Like” and “Follow” respectively to keep in touch!

[i] St. Clair County Sheriff police blotter dated 07/08/2014

[ii] BND.com, Nurse facing drug and neglect charges could lose her license, by Beth Hundsdorfer, Aug. 27, 2014.

Taking the time to understand physicians and their personal worries and fears

Physicians are people too. Taking a moment to acknowledge their real concerns and fears may give us all some perspective.

Physicians are people too. Taking a moment to acknowledge their real concerns and fears may give us all some perspective.

Our law firm focuses on health law and litigation, primarily addressing the professional licensing needs of physicians. We assist our clients when they have an issue involving the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (“IDFPR”). Just like lawyers, physicians are the subject of complaint and inquiry, sometimes simply when things don’t go well for a patient looking for someone to blame. Other times, there are legitimate concerns. Also like lawyers, physicians face challenges in their professional as well as personal lives.

What concerns physicians? Many things; an emergency room physician first prepares themselves for just about anything that could happen in a “routine” day. The ambulance might bring in a car accident victim, a child with a broken arm, or a grandmother with a strange rash and allergic response to the new food she’s never tried before. The practice of medicine requires professionals, including hospital staff, nurses and doctors to take patient histories and do their best job in understanding and treating the problem, often under the pressure of a ticking clock and room full of people waiting for care.

Can you imagine working in an industry where your profession is based on reacting to situations you don’t create and which are largely beyond your control? Giving doctors “a break” seems laughable to people who assume they make large salaries and operate like gods, being able to save lives and fix broken limbs. Try using some compassion for our medical professionals who wake up every day with immeasurable stress. Anyone who works with physicians may enjoy the following list of what most doctors worry about from day to day, regardless of their time to do anything to address their concerns.

“When you build trust, physicians disclose other concerns that keep them up at night:

  • Fear of being sued
  • Loss of autonomy
  • Bad medical outcomes.
  • Unhappy, grumpy patients
  • Referrals that come too late or not at all
  • Staffing conflicts
  • Burn-out
  • Patients who ignore doctors’ orders
  • Raising children while caring for aging parents.[i]

“Here are some topics that attract physicians’ attention:

  1. How to get more patient referrals.
  2. How to generate more practice revenue.
  3. How to get patients to thank physicians–rather than sue them.
  4. How to help patients get better outcomes.
  5. How to avoid staffing problems.
  6. How to protect against theft and fraud.
  7. How to use social media.
  8. How to minimize tax burdens.
  9. How to manage medical school debt (Millennials) or calculate retirement needs (Boomers).
  10. How to raise financially literate children.”

At Michael V. Favia and Associates, we work hard, with humility as lawyers and staff, to listen and understand our physician clients and the burdens they bear in their personal and professional lives. We assist with all their legal matters in connection with their professional licenses and careers.

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to help and meet for client consultations with offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburbs so you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.

 

[i] LinkedIn article, 10 topics that attract physicians’ attention, by Vicki Rackner, MD, Sept. 13, 2014.

Medicare fraud and kickbacks: Chicago psychologist loses his medical license indefinitely

Dr. Reinstein prescribed an alarming amount of clozapine to Illinois patients for kickbacks.

Dr. Reinstein prescribed an alarming amount of clozapine to Illinois patients for kickbacks.

Chicago area psychologist, Michael Reinstein, recently lost his medical license following the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (“IDFPR”) suspended his license for a minimum of  three years before Reinstein would be allowed to apply for reinstatement. When complaints of professional misconduct come to the attention of IDFPR, the licensing authority for many Illinois professionals, the IDFPR may cooperate with other state agencies to prevent further harm to Illinois residents. In this case, there was a determination that the doctor received, “Illegal direct and indirect remuneration” from the maker of generic clozapine. Further, reports indicate he did not consider alternative treatments and disregarded their well-being in the name of profit, according to a recent news report.[i]

Generally, the generic drug clozapine is used in the management of antipsychotic disorders, like schizophrenia, when nothing else works. According to a reputable website on pharmaceuticals, this because the drug carries a “concern for the side effect of agranulocytosis [reduction in white blood cell count], clozapine should be reserved for patients who have failed to respond to other standard medications or who are at risk for recurring suicidal behavior.[ii]

The Chicago Tribune published a 2009 story about Dr. Reinstein, highlighting the alarming amount of the antipsychotic clozapine prescribed to his patients. In 2007, he prescribed more clozapine to Illinois Medicaid program patients than, “all doctors in the Medicaid programs of Texas, Florida and North Carolina combined.[iii]

Dr. Reinstein was investigated by the U.S. Department of Justice who accused him of fraud. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois stated in a press release that the doctor, “received illegal kickbacks from pharmaceutical companies and submitted at least 140,000 false claims to Medicare and Medicaid for antipsychotic medications he prescribed for thousands of mentally ill patients in area nursing homes.[iv]

Medicare fraud is prosecuted under the False Claims Act.

The lawsuit against Dr. Reinstein, the largest civil case alleging prescription medication fraud, is the largest ever brought in Chicago against an individual. The U.S. Attorney’s press release reports that the doctor kept an office in the Uptown neighborhood on Chicago’s north side, where there is a large population of mentally ill nursing home residents. The predatory nature of prescribing strong medications that people might not need, especially when they might lack the capacity to understand and get a second opinion, is in part what is so shocking to people who find out such bad acts were happening so close to home.

The False Claims Act helps expose and prosecute those who make bogus claims for payment through government programs. To encourage people to speak up when they see something wrong, the whistleblowers are rewarded in a percentage of the amount recovered in a successful lawsuit. To learn more about whistleblower protection and the False Claims Act, under which Dr. Reinstein is held accountable, read our article, False Claims Act lawsuits and the whistleblowers who share in recoveries.

The IDFPR, in efforts to protect Illinois residents from wrongdoing professionals, takes action in an effort to protect people against future harms by the individual. You can review the August 8, 2014, IDFPR Order, finding and recommending that Dr. Reinstein’s Physician and Surgeon License be indefinitely suspended for a minimum period of three years. The doctor may wish to apply for reinstatement, but under other recent news we will share in a follow-up article, it is becoming harder to get a professional license reinstated after this type of discipline by the IDFPR.

If you believe you are aware of Medicaid and Medicare fraud, Attorney Michael V. Favia can help.

Michael V. Favia is a health law and litigation attorney whose practice includes IDFPR litigation. Favia is experienced in complex litigation involving government contract and similar types of fraud. Favia’s extensive health care law and litigation career allows him and a skilled group of associate colleagues the benefit of experience in representing clients with qui tam claims for violations of the False Claim Act. Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to help and meet for client consultations with offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburbs so you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.

[i] ProPublica, Illinois Suspends Medical License of Leading Prescriber of Antipsychotic Drugs, by Charles Ornstein, Aug. 11, 2014.

[ii] MedicineNet website, clozapine.

[iii] ProPublica, In Chicago’s Nursing Homes, a Psychiatrist Delivers High-Risk Meds, Cut-Rate Care, by Christina Jewett, ProPublica, and Sam Roe, Chicago Tribune, Nov. 10, 2009.

[iv] U.S. Department of Justice, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, Chicago Psychiatrist Allegedly Submitted At Least 190,000 False Claims to Medicare and Medicaid; Lawsuit Alleges Kickbacks to Prescribe Antipsychotic Medication for Nursing Home Patients, Nov. 15, 2012.

About the Health Care Workers Licensure Actions; Sex Crime Law

The offenses triggering action under this law are in the nature of general sex crimes.

The offenses triggering action under this law are in the nature of general sex crimes.

A recently adopted law identified as, Health care worker licensure actions; sex crimes, controls the licensing of Illinois health care workers who are involved in certain offenses, namely sex offenses. Specifically, the law applies to health care workers, as defined in the Health Care Worker Self-Referral Act, meaning “any individual licensed under the laws of this State to provide health services [most commonly known nurses, doctors, dentists and similar health care professionals]…”[i] The policy behind this legislation is to increase awareness and safety among patients so they do not have to worry about receiving treatment and services from a health care worker convicted of a sex crime, generally.

Under certain circumstances, a health care worker’s license will be automatically revoked, by operation of law, not requiring individual actions to revoke the license other than a qualifying event where the law applies. Additionally, this law prohibits any individual convicted of any of the listed qualifying offenses; they may not obtain or receive a new health care license.[ii]

The offenses triggering action under this law are in the nature of general sex crimes.

This law applies when an individual health care worker, covered under the Act, “(1) has been convicted of a criminal act that requires registration under the Sex Offender Registration Act; (2) has been convicted of a criminal battery against any patient in the course of patient care or treatment, including any offense based on sexual conduct or sexual penetration; (3) has been convicted of a forcible felony; or (4) is required as part of a criminal sentence to register under the Sex Offender Registration Act.[iii]

Immediately, upon charges being filed against a health care worker to whom this law applies, the prosecuting attorney shall notify the licensing department the identity of the individual charged and a copy of the charges, within 5 days. While the charges are pending the individual charged with the offense(s) may only practice with a “chaperone” (a licensed health care worker) whenever encountering a patient, while the charges are pending.[iv] Of course, these individuals are presumed innocent until proven guilty, but as a matter of policy, if charges are filed, it is important to take precautions to safeguard patients in the event the charges are proven and a conviction is entered against the individual health care worker.

In certain circumstances, charges and convictions of misconduct under this law can be removed.

In the case where the charges are dropped, the individual is not convicted of the charges, or the conviction for charges is vacated, overturned, or reversed, an administrative order will direct that the underlying charges be removed from the individual health care worker’s record with the appropriate agency, and from public view.[v]

Michael V. Favia works with Illinois-licensed health care workers and can assist with health care worker licensing matters and litigation.

If you are interested in learning more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, serving Chicago and its suburban communities, please visit the Favia Law Firm website for resources and articles of interest. To contact the firm to speak to a lawyer about a healthcare-related concern, you may dial (773) 631-4580. For more information about the firm’s practice areas, you can also visit the firm’sFacebook andTwitter sites. Please “LIke” and “Follow” respectively to keep in touch!

[i] 225 ILCS 47/1

[ii] 20 ILCS 2105/2105-165(b)

[iii] 20 ILCS 2105/2105-165(a)

[iv] 20 ILCS 2105/2105-165(c)

[v] 20 ILCS 2105/2105-165(e)

Telemedicine Guidelines Adopted by the Federation of State Medical Boards

Chicago health lawyer, Michael V. Favia recently reviewed the model policy and stated, “Physicians and health lawyers should become familiar with these rules."

Chicago health lawyer, Michael V. Favia recently reviewed the model policy and stated, “Physicians and health lawyers should become familiar with these rules.”
Photo (C) Lavine: LTC Insurance

Imagine you have a cold or sore throat, something minor but you know you need to see a doctor to get the prescription you want to get better. Sometimes it is too difficult and our schedules are so demanding that it makes more sense to handle routine medical appointments using technology instead of driving to the doctor’s office or hospital. Imagine how much productivity time at work is lost due to employees being out of work seeking medical attention. There is a new technology in town, at a hospital or doctor’s office near you and it is called telemedicine.

Mayo Clinic is one of the hospitals taking advantage of telemedicine and technology to treat patients all over who seek the advice of a specialist at watch this video and see a demonstration of how it all works at Mayo when they use telemedicine.

Telemedicine is defined by the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) as “the use of medical information exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications to improve a patient’s clinical health status.” Telemedicine may include services using two-way video, email, smart phones, wireless tools and other forms of telecommunications technology.[1]

Insurance companies, employers, hospital administrations all like the idea of telemedicine because the doctors can see more patients and there is a decreased burden on staff and hospital administration. Watch this interesting video demonstrating how telemedicine works. By going online and making an appointment with a doctor, the patient will be connected with their doctor or a license Doctor in their state. As you can imagine there are several concerns about law and policy regarding telecommunications and the practice of medicine when not conducted live and in person. The Federation of state medical boards House of Delegates recently adopted a model policy for the appropriate use of telemedicine technology, the “FSMB Telemedicine Policy.” A FSMB press release states that telemedicine, “provides much needed guidance and a basic roadmap that state boards can use to ensure that patients are protected from harm in a fast-changing health care delivery environment.”

Read the Model Policy for the Appropriate Use of Telemedicine Technologies in the Practice of Medicine. Chicago health lawyer, Michael V. Favia recently reviewed the model policy and stated, “Physicians and health lawyers should become familiar with these rules.[2]

Here is a summary as published in the recent article in the JD Supra Business Advisor,[3] “The FSMB Telemedicine Policy includes the following guidelines for the “appropriate use of telemedicine technologies in a medical practice:”

  • physician must be licensed or under the jurisdiction of the medical board of the state where the patient is located;
  • physician must take appropriate steps to establish a physician-patient relationship;
  • there must be a documented medical evaluation before providing treatment to the patient;
  • patient must provide informed consent for the use of telemedicine technologies;
  • patient should have the ability to seek, “with relative ease,” follow-up care from the physician who provided care through telemedicine;
  • physician must have an emergency plan in place if referral to an acute care facility or emergency room is appropriate for the patient;
  • patient’s medical records should be accessible and documented for the physician and patient in accordance with all requirements for medical records;
  • physician should “meet or exceed” federal and state privacy requirements, including HIPAA;
  • online services used by a physician should make specific disclosures including fee arrangements and physician contact information; and
  • steps need to be taken to ensure the prescribing physician upholds patient safety in the absence of an in-person examination, including confirming the identity of the patient.”

If you have any questions about the model policy and how health lawyers and physicians can take the proper steps to learn and integrate the policy into their practice you may contact Michael V. Favia for more information by calling (773) 631-4580.

If you are interested in learning more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, serving Chicago and its suburban communities, please visit the Favia Law Firm website for resources and articles of interest. To contact the firm to speak to a lawyer about a healthcare-related concern, you may dial (773) 631-4580. For more information about the firm’s practice areas, you can also visit the firm’s Facebook and Twitter sites. Please “LIke” and “Follow” respectively to keep in touch!

[1] JD Supra Business Advisor, State Medical Board Association Adopts Telemedicine Guidelines. By Bruce D. Armon and Karilynn Baus, May 9, 2014.

[2] Michael V. Favia is the principal of The Law Firm of Michael V. Favia & Associates in Chicago.

[3] See FN 1 above.

Medical Spa Update: Illinois Nurse Practitioners may have more expanded roles in some spas

Necessity is the mother of invention, so says the English proverb. The need to marry the healing benefits of the spa and fitness industry with Western medicine may not have been apparent until recently, but today many people would miss the convenience and benefits of Medical Spas. The National Coalition of Estheticians, Manufacturers / Distributors and

As becoming increasingly popular, medical spas are also becoming more regulated, but some restrictions are relaxing -- at least in Illinois.

As becoming increasingly popular, medical spas are also becoming more regulated, but some restrictions are relaxing — at least in Illinois.

Associations (NCEA) defines a medical spa as being, “A facility that during all hours of business shall operate under the on-site supervision of a licensed healthcare professional operating within their scope of practice, with a staff that operates within their scope of practice as defined by their individual licensing board if licensure is required. The facility may offer traditional, complementary, and alternative health practices and treatments in a spa-like setting.[i]

As becoming increasingly popular, medical spas are also becoming more regulated, but some restrictions are relaxing — at least in Illinois.

Medical spas often provide cosmetic procedures, considered medical, including laser hair removal, Botox injections and microdermabrasion. Most states require the medical supervision of a licensed physician. In many states, a lack of medical supervision in med spa facilities caused crackdowns in non-compliant operations. In Illinois the Department of Financial and Professional Regulations (“IDFPR”) oversees and investigates the med spa industry. In December 2010, the IDFPR published a news release regarding doctor supervision at medical spas, “State Warns Holiday Shoppers to Remember: Safety First.”

The law in Illinois controlling the Medical Spa industry is the Medical Practice Act of 1987. Recently, Governor Pat Quinn signed a law amending the Medical Practice Act to expand the role of Advanced Practice Nurses, including nurse practitioners, as noted in a recent press release.[ii] The new law amends Section 54.5 of the Medical Practice Act concerning nurse practitioners and Advanced Practice Nurses.

Medical spas Nurse Practitioners play a (now expanded) important role in the Med Spa industry.

The recent press release highlighting the changes to the Medical Practice Act state that prior to the change, “Nurse Practitioners (NP’s) were limited to practicing only those medical services that the NP’s collaborating physician provided to patients in his or her clinical medical practice. The written collaborative agreements required between NP and their collaborating physicians (which laid out the details of the collaborative arrangement) were also restricted to services the collaborating physician provided to patients.[iii]

With the change in the law, Nurse Practitioners may now perform laser hair removal treatments and inject Botox as part of their normal patient practice, and those procedures are not restricted by the limits of collaborating physician providers. The language of the Act now states, “The written collaborative agreement shall be [between an APN and a collaborating physician] for services the collaborating physician generally provides or may provide in his or her clinical practice.[iv]” The key change being the phrase “or may provide” that broadens the scope of the Nurse Practitioner.

Michael V. Favia & Associates serve professionals in the Med Spa industry.

Professionals in the Med Spa industry have a duty to uphold policies and laws controlling the practice and delivery of health and medical services in local spa facilities. Michael V. Favia & Associates works with Med Spa owners to help make sure they operate in compliance with applicable laws and regulations. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discreet meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.

[i] The National Coalition of Estheticians, Manufacturers / Distributors and Associations website:Medical Spa Definition.

[ii] PR Web:AmSpa News Alert: Illinois Nurse Practitioners Get Expanded Role. Mar. 31, 2014.

[iii] See PR Web Article above.

[iv] See PR Web Article above.