Tag Archives: Chicago Loop

Congress on Concussions: A review of recent press and activity on contact sports and brain injuries

Thursday in testimony on Capitol Hill. “That's one of the reasons we love it.”"

“UNL physics professor Timothy Gay explains the physics of football in this file photo. “American football is an inherently violent sport,” he said Thursday in testimony on Capitol Hill. “That’s one of the reasons we love it.”” Article Link 

According to research calculations conducted by a physics professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, “professional football players have become so much bigger and faster than the amount of force at work along the line of scrimmage is now twice what it was when the NFL started.[i]” Professor Timothy Gay testified at a congressional hearing in Congress about the current research findings about concussions and in explaining the force of some hits in football. “A helmet-to-helmet collision at top speed is roughly the same as having a 16-pound bowling ball dropped on a player’s helmet from 8 feet up.[ii]” Is football dangerous? Yes, as professor, Gay says, “American football is an inherently violent sport,” he said. “That’s one of the reasons we love it.[iii]

Congress appears to be urging the NFL to continue making changes to its policies with respect to concussions.

VIDEO LINK: ‘This Week’: Congress on Concussions. ABC News’ Jim Avila and ESPN’s Jeremy Schapp on the recent congressional hearing on sports concussions.[iv]

Sports and safety go together more frequently than peanut butter and jelly lately. The increase in research, published findings, and incidents of long-term injuries and damages from concussions are popular topics on the field, in the courtroom and on Capitol Hill. The video linked above mentions some notable facts about sports and traumatic brain injury:

  • 250,000 kids get head injuries
  • 6 million kids play tackle or flag football
  • Players absorb 650 hits to the head every season.
  • Forces each players hitting at full speeds exceeds ¾ a ton.
  • Soccer players are the second most at risk of injury

Contrary to what many critics think, the intention behind many of the concussion lawsuits, research, publications and discussion is not about taking contact sports away, rather the goal is to teach players how to tackle safely and learn to avoid the most dangerous hits.

A change in the culture of contact sports like football is also a factor. Historically there has been what some call a “misplaced macho attitude” encouraging injured players to continue practicing and playing despite their concussion injuries. In the early days of brain injury research, less was known about the long-term effects of concussions. Today, doctors and organizations concerned with sports safety conduct extensive symposiums to share information and promote awareness.

What can or should Congress do? The video linked above suggests Congress should continue to nudge the NFL to make sure research is funded and advances are made in concussion education and prevention. The NFL can send a message that football can be played safely.

Michael V. Favia & Associates represent clients with sports injuries. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a meeting with an attorney at your convenience. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, please visit the firm’s website and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.


[i] Omaha World-Herald: UNL professors take the lead at concussion hearings in Congress. By Joseph Morton, Mar. 14, 2014.

[ii] Omaha World-Herald quote from article cited above.

[iii] Omaha World-Herald quote from article cited above.

Injuries from potholes and street repairs: About municipal liability and the Tort Immunity Act.

Do you know what to do if you are injured by pothole not yet patched or repaired?

Do you know what to do if you are injured by a pothole not yet patched or repaired?

Spring weather means road construction and pothole repair on many Northern Illinois roadways. The city of Chicago may be paying closer attention to dangerous conditions after a recent Cook County Court awarded $2.7 million to a postal worker who ruptured his ACL in March 2008. The injured worker, was “not able to see the sinkhole in the crosswalk,” said his attorney, Gerald Bekkerman, “because it was obscured by the mail cart he was pushing. Even after six surgeries and years of therapy, the postal worker is still unable to return to work. [i]

The city of Chicago would have certainly repaired a known pothole, right? In his comments to reporters Bekkerman stated, “The city of Chicago admitted that it knew about the sinkhole for a period of six months through numerous 311 calls and even took trips to the scene to examine the sinkhole. At trial, they admitted they knew the sinkhole could cause harm. However, it was not repaired–or covered.[ii]

Do you know what to do if you are injured by a pothole not yet patched or repaired?

The first thing to consider is who owns the property where the injury took place. Was it a city street within the incorporated city limits? Roads can be owned and maintained by cities, counties, townships, state and private individuals. A few phone calls to local offices can help in determining who is responsible for roadway maintenance and repairs.

In many instances, the proper procedure requires an injured person to file a notice of a potential injury claim with the municipality. These notices can be treated like claims to recover from insurance policies. The injury claim will be considered and either paid as requested or rejected. When claims receive low ball offers or rejections people usually hire lawyers to file their complaint in court, suing the municipality for damages. Note that cases like this one, against the city of Chicago, must be filed within the statutory limitations period of one year of the incident.[iii]

The city is liable for the performance of its duties, including pothole repair.

While local governments are generally immune from liability for negligence and willful and wanton misconduct, they are not immune from liability from the performance of ministerial tasks. Repairs to roads are generally considered ministerial tasks for which the local government may be liable if negligently performed.[iv]  Whether acts are discretionary or ministerial, for purposes of determining a local government’s immunity from liability is determined on a case-by-case basis.

Illinois law states municipalities have a duty to reasonably maintain crosswalks for pedestrians.[v] Regarding liability for pot hole repair and whether it is considered a ministerial task, the Illinois Supreme Court has previously held that ‘[a] municipal corporation acts judicially or exercises discretion when it selects and adopts a plan in the making of public improvements, but as soon as it begins to carry out that plan it acts ministerially and is bound to see that the work is done in a reasonably safe and skillful manner.’[vi]

Here is a link to the Illinois Tort Immunity Act. The question of whether the city acted negligently in performing ministerial tasks for which it may be liable depends on the facts and each instance of injury. If you are injured by a street repair or lack thereof, an injury attorney at Michael V. Favia & Associates can help. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.

 


[i] Sun Times: Mega-pothole remains despite 911 call, by Fran Spielman, Mar. 11, 2014.

[ii] Sun Times: Mega-pothole remains despite 911 call, by Fran Spielman, Mar. 11, 2014.

[iii] 745 ILCS 10/8-101. Limitation. (a) No civil action other than an action described in subsection (b) may be commenced in any court against a local entity or any of its employees for an injury unless it is commenced within one year from the date that the injury was received or the cause of action accrued.

[iv] 745 ILCS 10/2-201, 3-102(a).

[v] 745 ILCS 10/3-102(a).

[vi] Hanley v. City of Chicago, 343 Ill.App.3d 49, 56, 795 N.E.2d 808, 814 (1st Dist. 2003)

Doctors prevent patient injury and avoid lawsuits: six tips and best practices

"To identify the most overlooked risks to physicians, Medical Economics asked several thought leaders to share their insight into strategies for protecting office-based practices."

“To identify the most overlooked risks to physicians, Medical Economics asked several thought leaders to share their insight into strategies for protecting office-based practices.”

A friend recently shared a sad story about a young student who went to the hospital complaining of general pain and discomfort who recently died after being in a coma, and the family believes the specialist and administration failed them. The student of veterinary science’s professor visited during treatment before the student slipped into a coma. As family members and friends, who knew a little something about medicine, made suggestions, they were quickly dismissed. The specialist was certain that the student had a textbook case of her illness, and the administration was not about to question the specialist. Are non-physicians reading too much into what they read online? Are the specialists really at fault? What happens when families are fed up and file malpractice and wrongful death suits for patient injury and death?

A recent article offered several tips for physicians who want to prevent patient injury and avoid lawsuits[i].

  1. Informed Consent. Do you ever listen to the list of side effects on commercials for pharmaceuticals? If you slowed down and spent some time considering all the actual and apparent risks involved you might not take as many medications. When discussing various treatment options with patients and their loved ones, the full disclosure to promote a clear understanding of risks them make more informed decisions. Knowing for example, that surgery could lead to paralysis or death, is important to patients who should be an active player during the course of their treatment. Physicians should document informed consent practices so they can improve on these tasks and skills sets. Also, mitigating allegations by patients can be easier with well documented practices.
  2. Communication Failures. Physicians have a very small window of time to tell patients and their families about outcomes, both positive and negative. Patients certainly want to be kept in the loop and adequately informed about their progress and when things might be okay. The level of detail and explanation can get lost in communication. To put it simply, something that might be normal in the course of diagnosis, treatment and response to a physician, could seem very alarming to a patient or family under unusually high stress and pressure. On a case by case basis a smart physician should prioritize full and honest disclosure and communication with the patient and family. Preserving the sense of trust and diligence may allow people to be more forgiving in response to errors or bad news.
  3. Standards and Training. The current standards of practice should be studied by physicians in their areas of practice. Standards are frequently updated as more is learned about best practices in disease management for acute and chronic conditions. New advances in technology and recently published research results are imperative to physicians who are constantly learning and evolving in their practice of allopathic medicine. When doctors fail to keep up with current standards and medical training they are offering outdated medical services to understandably upset patients and families when things don’t go as well as possible.
  4. Diagnostic Test and Specialist Referral Follow-up. Patients often feel that every ordered test, x-ray and lab result is a piece of the puzzle and can solve the medical problem at hand. Sometimes those test results do not make it back to the treating physician in time or are dispensed with before the physician could properly review them and the findings are not communicated to the patient. Extra attention paid to tracking results can help prevent costly errors that upset patients and families and could cause harm. Referrals to specialists are also very important in the course of treatment because one medical professional should know what the other involved doctors are doing and what they have to say about treatment.
  5. Policy and Procedure Variation. Hospital administrations and policy and procedure directions can make any professional’s job seem like a nightmare. What compounds the problem of a volume of information that can be tough to manage is the shifting set of standards from administration to administration and from doctor to doctor. This makes the process of giving medical care and treatment very difficult if the medical professionals must constantly second guess whether what they are doing is appropriate and pursuant to the correct policy.
  6. Avoidance Behavior. With new advances and new technologies there is a counterweighing level of risk. Bad outcomes should be communicated directly and physicians should not avoid being the bearer of bad news. Managing expectations also can mean managing patient and family hope that a good outcome can occur when least expected. Many people suffering from despair and the agony of bad medical outcomes need the support of the treating physicians who did the best they could which sometimes just is not enough. Avoiding and hiding from people and unpleasant situations can look like a guilty behavior. It is better to confront people directly than let them wonder and come to their own possibly incorrect conclusions on their own.

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to assist physicians with professional licensing matters and lawsuits for medical negligence and patient death. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.


[i] Medical Economics. Six ways physicians can prevent patient injury and avoid lawsuits. By Susan Kreimer. Dec. 10, 2013.

11,000 tablets of Oxycodone: Illinois physician’s license is on the line

Gregory M Bulava MD

Gregory M Bulava MD

This week the medical disciplinary board of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (“IDFPR”) was scheduled to hold a hearing on the status of Dr. Gregory M. Bulava, MD’s license to practice medicine in Illinois. The IDFPR temporarily suspended Bulava’s license upon accusations he prescribed over 11,000 Oxycodone painkiller pills to an individual patient. The IDFPR can suspend a professional license, on a temporary basis, when there is a report of wrongdoing. In this case the report suggested Bulava lied to the US DEA when they investigated him. According to the complaint, Bulava, “Told them that the people whose names were on the prescriptions were patients of his who were hurt on the job or were involved in vehicle accidents.[i]

Be aware that private professional listing sites are not primary sources of information about a professional’s license status.

Dr. Bulava can be found on several healthcare industry ratings websites as a board certified family practitioner, in many cases with positive ratings[ii]. Note that as of the 26th of November 2013, the date of this entry, Dr. Bulava appears on websites to be a practitioner in good standing despite the fact that the state has temporarily suspended his license. This is important to highlight for consumer shopping for physicians. State licensing boards such as the IDFPR are primary sources of licensing and inquiries as to the professional’s license history. Private websites, while often containing patient reviews, are not the primary source for determining is the physician is actively licensed to practice.

There are many published articles identifying the abuse of painkillers, specifically oxycodone (often known by brand-named OxyContin). An article on the popular and consumer-friendly WebMD site, Dr. Drew Pinsky (famous of the Loveline radio show) is quoted as stating, “What makes OxyContin dangerous is not only that it’s addictive, it can also be lethal…It makes you feel you can tolerate more, but it can precipitate respiratory failure, especially when used with other drugs like alcohol or benzodiazepenes.[iii]

Instructions on looking up a professional’s license status with the IDFPR:

"The Department of Financial and Professional Regulation said Friday that Gregory M. Bulava provided the person with prescriptions in the names of people who were never the doctor's patients."

AP: “The Department of Financial and Professional Regulation said Friday that Gregory M. Bulava provided the person with prescriptions in the names of people who were never the doctor’s patients.”

To search for a professional and reports of misconduct you can visit www.idfpr.com then use the “License Look Up” link that appears under the “Agency Quick Links” section in the upper left column of the IDFPR home page. When you click on “License Look Up” you will be directed select the profession in the drop down list, in this case, select Physician. Next, enter the last name, Bulava, and click/tap the “Search” button. The results showing as of the date of this article, the licensee’s name, Gregory M. Bulava MD has multiple licenses and their status is suspended. There is a button on the right of the search result grid for Dr. Bulava with a “Y” on the icon reading “Ever Disciplined?” When you click on that yes icon, you are directed to the page identifying “Temporary Suspension – 11/22/2013 – License temporarily suspended for non-therapeutic prescribing of controlled substances.”

If the IDFPR continues the suspension and takes further disciplinary actions, that information may be included in IDFPR monthly disciplinary reports that contain information that is more specific. By way of example, click/tap here to view the IDFPR monthly disciplinary report for October 2013. When the IDFPR makes its disciplinary report, if any, in this case, further information will be listed on the website and this blog will be updated at that time.

Conducting due diligence on current or new professionals with whom you wish to hire or associate can help prevent surprises down the road. Knowing that third party website hosts do not inherently know the status of a professional’s license is important and creating diligence habits can make us all safer when we work with professionals required to be licensed to practice their craft.

Michael V. Favia & Associates assist professionals with analysis and representation on IDFPR matters ranging from professionals new to Illinois and currently licensed Illinois professionals facing potential discipline. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.


[ii] Website listing, Healthgrades.com: Dr. Gregory M. Bulava, MD (cache link: click here)

[iii] WebMD: OxyContin: Pain Relief vs. Abuse.

Skokie dentist sued for allegedly dropping dental tool down patient’s throat

When you go to the dentist, you do not likely anticipate that you will swallow a dental tool and later need multiple surgeries to extricate the foreign object. Bernard Bell, a 92-year-old Skokie man, asked his attorney to file a lawsuit against Skokie dentist, Dr. Toni Ellis Wolf, with allegations of medical malpractice, claiming Wolf “dropped a metal instrument down his throat, causing the device to get stuck in his stomach.[i]” The Chicago Sun Times article by Luke Wilusz, also states, “According to the suit, Bell experienced “pain in his throat and esophagus, and sleeplessness, irritability and general discomfort prior to and immediately after removal of the subject dental tool.”

Dental tool allegedly dropped down 92-year-old Bernard Bell's throat.

Dental tool allegedly dropped down 92-year-old Bernard Bell’s throat.

The complaint filed by attorney Raphael Strzelecki of RDS Law Offices in Skokie, alleges two counts of medical malpractice with relief sought against Dr. Wolf in excess of $50,000 for damages suffered by Bell. In the same Sun Times article Strzelecki was quoted, stating, “Nobody walks into a dental office and expects to walk out with a dental tool in their stomach.”

In Illinois, “In an action for medical professional negligence the plaintiff must prove by expert testimony that the defendant physician failed to conform to the applicable standard of care unless the alleged negligence is grossly apparent or is obvious to a layman.[ii]” Professionals are judged by a standard of care (they should use and exercise the same degree of knowledge, skill and ability) that “an ordinary careful professional would exercise under similar circumstances.[iii]

When a lawsuit is filed against a professional for something such as medical malpractice, the State of Illinois can get involved and might conduct its own independent investigation into exactly what happened and whether its own discipline is necessary. Professional licensure issues are addressed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR).[iv]

If you are regulated by the IDFPR and need advice on what to do if you learn of an inquiry regarding your practice, do not panic; Michael V. Favia & Associates offers tips on dealing with the IDFPR located on their Illinois Licensing website. From the website, you can also submit your name and email to receive a more detailed article titled, “Summary of the Disciplinary Process and 10 Tips for Responding to an IDFPR Inquiry.”

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to assist with analysis and advice on a difficult IDFPR matter. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.


[i] Chicago Sun Times: August 6, 2013, Luke Wilusz, Lawsuit claims Skokie dentist dropped tool down man’s throat

[ii] Addison v. Whittenberg, 124 Ill.2d 287, 529 N.E.2d 552, 124 Ill.Dec. 571 (1988) (further citations omitted)(Cited in Section 105.00 (Professional Negligence) of the Circuit Court Civil Jury Instructions.

[iii] Northern Trust Co. v. Louis A. Weiss Memorial Hosp., 143 Ill.App.3d 479, 493 N.E.2d 6, 97 Ill.Dec. 524 (1st. Dist. 1986) (further citations omitted)(Cited in Section 105.00 (Professional Negligence) of the Circuit Court Civil Jury Instructions.

High-tech helmets and concussion safety: UW Health study

"Football helmets have evolved a great deal over the last 50 years. Current helmet designs are heavier, larger and designed to absorb and dissipate impact forces to a greater extent than earlier models used by football players."

“Football helmets have evolved a great deal over the last 50 years. Current helmet designs are heavier, larger and designed to absorb and dissipate impact forces to a greater extent than earlier models used by football players.”

Football season starts soon and players are training to take the field. From the youngest players in grade school to the professional athletes taking the field before millions of fans, concussions are frequent discussion topics. As athletes who suffered traumatic brain injury (“TBI”) file more lawsuits, the manufacturers of safety equipment strive to offer new products that could help prevent concussion injury and damage. It makes sense that a properly fitting helmet could reduce impact to a player’s head, but what about the brain? Can high-tech helmets prevent concussions?

A recent article published in Athletic Business, a popular resource site for athletics professionals, focuses on vendors offering high-tech helmets.[i] Reviewing and commenting on research by Dr. Timothy McGuine and researchers at the University of Wisconsin, AB writers ask, “Is that new technology actually doing any good? New research would say no.” The article, published by UW Health Sports Medicine, “Sports Medicine Research: Helmets and Concussions,” reports the studies of Dr. McGuine and Dr. Alison Brooks.[ii]

The Vengeance DCT is the newest helmet from Schutt Sports. The "DCT" stands for Dual Compression Technology. The 4th Generation of TPU Cushioning contains durometers that are specifically designed to absorb both high-velocity and low-velocity impacts.

The Vengeance DCT is the newest helmet from Schutt Sports. The “DCT” stands for Dual Compression Technology. The 4th Generation of TPU Cushioning contains durometers that are specifically designed to absorb both high-velocity and low-velocity impacts.

“UW Health Sports Medicine is leading a research study to assess the effect of helmet brand on the incidence of sport related concussion in high school football players.”[iii]

The AB article mentions helmets that incorporate new technology, such as one offered by Schutt Sports.[iv] The UW Health article mentions that there are, “…new helmets with claims of laboratory testing that their “helmets offer the maximum protection” or “reduce the risk of concussion.” Further, the article states, “Unfortunately, there is little, if any evidence that the use of a specific football helmet brand will make it more or less likely that a high school football player will sustain a SRC [Sport-related Concussion] while actually participating in high school football.”

Which manufacturer would you choose if you were the high school athletics professional? The helmets that perform better in a fixed testing environment could help players be safer, but to say there could be safety guarantees in an inherently violent contact sport would be a stretch. The “safer” helmets are one component of player safety. Another important element is player education. Learning how to tackle in safer manners can help prevent injury. Spotting concussion symptoms and reporting them to team physicians can also increase safety.

We look forward to following up with the UW Health researches when they compile and share the incidence of sports-related concussions among the three helmet brands the group is tracking. Michael V. Favia & Associates follows and reports on sports injury topics and trends. The firm represents injured persons including athletes suffering from traumatic brain injuries.

ABOUT THE FIRM: The Law Firm of Michael V. Favia & Associates is a successful General Civil Practice dedicated to providing personalized service and high quality representation for clients. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. Feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter and you will be kept in the loop about upcoming events and news in the firm’s practice areas including personal injury, medical malpractice, worker’s compensation, complex civil litigation and professional regulation and licensing.

 

Appeals court upheld Illinois refusal to renew license to mortgage broker pursuant to SAFE Act

“This outcome is unquestionably harsh,” the Court agrees, despite affirming the decision to deny the renewal of an Illinois mortgage broker whose past felony conviction blocked his present and future due to provisions of the SAFE Act written to amend minimum requirements for practice.[i] The SAFE Act is a federal law imposing compliance policy on the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (“Department”). Following the 2006 housing bubble burst, Congress enacted the SAFE Act and its uniform national standards in response to predatory lending and bad practices, generally.

Amendments to the SAFE Act prohibit the issuance or renewal of a mortgage broker license under circumstances including a conviction for fraud, and courts must follow the Act.

Appellate Court: "The 2009 amendment has changed the minimum requirements for practice and Vali Mohammad does not meet the amended requirements."

Appellate Court: “The 2009 amendment has changed the minimum requirements for practice and Vali Mohammad does not meet the amended requirements.”

The purpose of the 2009 enacted SAFE Act is to “impose uniform national standards in order to curb predatory lending practices and [to use] required fingerprinting and issuance of unique, life-time identifiers to prevent unscrupulous mortgage loan originators simply moving from jurisdiction.”[ii] Note that this is Federal law and the Department, overseeing mortgage brokers in Illinois, must follow the licensing standards imposed by the SAFE Act. Effective July 31, 2009, an amendment to the Act imposed on the Department that its licensed mortgage brokers comply with Section 7-3 that prohibits licensing of any applicants with felony convictions for fraud, among other criteria.[iii]

In this case, Mohammad became a mortgage broker in 2001, a new career for him. “By 2006, he had five employees, owned his commercial building and five rental homes, and was the recipient of two awards from the Chicago Association of Realtors and one from the chamber of commerce for the communities of Green Oaks, Libertyville, Mundelein, and Vernon Hills, Illinois.[iv] Despite his success as a loan originator and real estate, an unrelated past conviction stopped Mohammad from continuing business as usual when he received a letter from the Department, refusing to renew his license to practice mortgage brokerage in Illinois.

When Mohammad applied to renew is license in 2005 or 2006, according to the Court in Mohammad, he disclosed to the Department that he had a mail fraud conviction from the year 2000. The fraud conviction was the end of a drawn out battle with a previous company and had nothing to do with Mohammad’s career in lending as overseen by the Department who on June 30, 2010, notified him that his license could not be renewed because he did satisfy the requirements for the license pursuant to the SAFE Act as amended.

The trial court and the appellate court considered many arguments and facts concerning Mohammad and his career, but there was no provision in the Act for exceptions, and therefore the strict application of the law caused Mohammad to be ineligible to practice mortgage brokerage in Illinois. The Court, “Unfortunately, the applicable law of the State of Illinois is very clear on this matter. A felony conviction involving fraud or dishonesty is a clear violation of 205 ILCS 635/7-3(2) and a complete bar to holding a loan originator license.”[v]

Mohammad’s counsel made several legal arguments regarding the facts in this case and the application of the laws that affected his license. Michael V. Favia & Associates offers tips on dealing with the IDFPR located on their Illinois Licensing website. From the website, you can also submit your name and email to receive a more detailed article titled, “Summary of the Disciplinary Process and 10 Tips for Responding to an IDFPR Inquiry.”

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to assist with analysis and advice on a difficult IDFPR matter. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.


[ii] Mohammed at ¶ 11, citing Bryce Gray, The Secure and Fair Enforcement for Mortgage Licensing Act of 2008, 31 Rev. Banking & Fin. L. 51 (2011) (discussing the circumstances that led to passage of the SAFE Act and explaining the law’s components).

[iii] Mohammed at ¶ 6.

[iv] Mohammed at ¶ 4.

[v] Mohammed at ¶ 8