Category Archives: Personal Injuries

How do you know if you have an opioid problem?

Anyone can develop an addiction to painkillers. Doctors, nurses and all healthcare professionals are tasked with monitoring patients to whom opioids are prescribed. We hear news stories about pill mills, billing fraud and monitoring programs to keep patients safe and prevent drug diversion and downstream black market sales. Meanwhile, who is monitoring the healthcare professionals up stream? It is too easy to imagine what an addict looks like or where they are getting their pain killers, sometimes it is harder to look right in the mirror.

People with abuse and addiction propensities may not be aware of the stronghold opioids can take on someone’s life. It is said that at stages of addiction the synapses are not firing the same and judgment can be impaired. The moment of realization of not being able to quit taking opioids can certainly be one of shock, fear and loss of control.

You might be able to stop for a day or more, maybe a week or two. Without getting proper detox and rehabilitative care, the cycle of use and addiction is not likely to stop on its own. Once people accept that they have no control over the addiction it can be easier to ask for help, especially when they can accept with the help of others that it is not their fault and it is a disease, from which they can be cured.

Not everyone who uses opioids safely and under a physician’s monitoring is or will become addicted. There are a few signs and symptoms of which to be aware.

Salem, Virginia’s Mount Regis Center for hope, treatment and recovery shares a list of symptoms of opioid addiction as follows, noting that not all individuals with addiction will display all the symptoms. That said, the following are common[i]:

“Mood symptoms:

  • Mood swings
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Euphoric mood for a few hours
  • Irritability

Behavioral symptoms:

  • Forging prescriptions for opiates
  • Stealing narcotics from friends and family
  • Robbing pharmacies and other medication dispensaries
  • Not fulfilling familial and other responsibilities
  • Decreased performance at job or school
  • Preoccupation with obtaining, using, and recovering from usage of opiates
  • Lying to others to cover the amount of drug taken
  • Withdrawing from once-pleasurable activities
  • Social isolation
  • Restlessness
  • Lethargy

Physical symptoms:

  • Exhaustion
  • Pain relief
  • Respiratory depression
  • Sedation
  • Muscle spasms
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Constipation
  • Itching
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Sweating
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

Psychological symptoms:

  • Addiction
  • Memory problems
  • Hallucinations
  • Delusions
  • Paranoia
  • Worsening of mental health
  • Decrease in emotional well-being
  • Increase in symptoms of mental illness”

The article about opioid abuse and addiction is worth your review and covers co-occurring disorders, statistics, causes, symptoms and the effects of opioid withdrawal.

The more we learn and share about addiction, the more proactive we all may be in helping our family, friends and colleagues when we see someone may be in trouble and not know why.

About us: Michael V. Favia & Associates, P.C. is a health law, litigation and licensing firm in Chicago representing individuals, healthcare professionals and organizations with civil legal matters as well as professional licensing and regulation.

Chicago health law and litigation attorney Michael V. Favia and his associates in several locations and disciplines, advise and represent private individuals as well as healthcare professionals in all types of litigation and administrative matters involving licensing and regulatory agencies.

Michael V. Favia and Associates, P.C. represents individual physicians and health care organizations in the Chicago area with a variety of legal matters. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. Michael V. Favia & Associates is available at (773) 631-4580. Please visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You can also review endorsements and recommendations for Michael V. Favia on his Avvo.com profile and on LinkedIn.

 

[i] Mount Regis Center website, Opiates – effects signs and symptoms

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Favia will work with the firm’s members in the Chicago office and nationwide on professional licensing matters.

Dedicated Medicare Compliance Practice: The QPWB Advantage, Michael V. Favia, Of Counsel

Michael V. Favia and Michael V. Favia & Associates, P.C., are Of Counsel to Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A. (QPWB), the full-service business law firm with offices located in several U.S. states and overseas.[i] QPWB maintains a Dedicated Medicare Compliance Group and works with insurance carriers in connection with direct and indirect claims involving Medicare reimbursement. Because attorney Favia and the firm are Of Counsel to QPWB, the firm has access to the benefits of this advanced compliance practice group.

There are a variety of services QPWBs compliance group can offer to self-insured companies and insurance carriers with worker’s compensation and liability claims. How and when to pay claims and submit reimbursements to Medicare can be daunting when mistakes can result in bad faith claims and unanticipated economic losses.

The QPWB Dedicated Medicare Compliance Group can assume a variety of responsibilities for insurance clients, including without limitation, claim investigation, conditional payment negotiation, and funding submissions where future medical expenses are certain or likely. Because every client and claim is unique, the QPWB group uses a proprietary system to properly assess and manage each and every claim.

“The QPWB Advantage:

  • We address each claim on its own merits and not in a cookie cutter manner;
  • As attorneys, we act as advocates on behalf of our clients focusing on every factual, legal and medical argument to help develop strategies to reduce exposure;
  • We make realistic recommendations so that clients can make informed decisions and work towards understanding and resolving compliance issues in the most economical fashion;
  • The firm provides attorneys with decades of experience in counseling self-insured and insurance clients;
  • Decades of experience meeting with opposing parties and attending Administrative and Judicial pre-trials to address compliance issues.
  • We provide individualized attention to the needs of our clients, from the smallest matter to the largest.[ii]

In addition to direct claim management, QPWB works with external vendors and attorneys focused on primary payer issues, cost projections, medical arguments and claim settlements.

For more information about direct and indirect insurance claims and Medicare compliance, please contact Michael V. Favia & Associates, P.C.

About us: Michael V. Favia & Associates, P.C. is a health law and litigation firm in Chicago representing individuals, healthcare professionals and organizations with civil legal matters as well as professional licensing and regulation.

Chicago health law and litigation attorney Michael V. Favia and his associates in several locations and disciplines, advise and represent private individuals as well as healthcare professionals in all types of litigation and administrative matters involving licensing and regulatory agencies.

Michael V. Favia and Associates, P.C. represents individual physicians and health care organizations in the Chicago area with a variety of legal matters. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. Michael V. Favia & Associates is available at (773) 631-4580. Please visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You can also review endorsements and recommendations for Michael V. Favia on his Avvo.com profile and on LinkedIn.

 

[i] QPWB office locations are located in Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Texas, and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

[ii] See QPWB’s website for more information about the Dedicated Medicare Compliance Practice.

Home health, the Illinois Elder Abuse and Neglect Act, reporting laws

One of the most difficult decisions we can face as adults is what to do when our parents can no longer take care of themselves and need professional healthcare and daily living assistance. In recent years, home healthcare is an option many pursue so mom or dad can stay home in the safety and comfort of their own environment. Residential home boarding facilities, are similar to licensed nursing homes and are also an option when the resident has more immediate health concerns and may require more attention. The State of Illinois Department on Aging mission statement is, “to serve and advocate for older Illinoisans and their caregivers by administering quality and culturally appropriate programs that promote partnerships and encourage independence, dignity, and quality of life.” [i] The state publishes a guide containing relevant laws and other resources for families of senior citizens, The Elder Abuse and Neglect Act and Related Laws.

About the Illinois Elder Abuse and Neglect Act

Abuse is defined by the Elder Abuse and Neglect Act (Act) as meaning, “causing any physical, mental or sexual injury to an eligible adult, including exploitation of such adult’s financial resources.” The Act covers eligible adults, defined as, “a person 60 years of age or older who resides in a domestic living situation and is, or is alleged to be, abused, neglected, or financially exploited by another individual or who neglects himself or herself.” The required domestic living situation is, “a residence where the eligible adult at the time of the report lives alone or with his or her family or a caregiver, or others, or a board and care home or other community-based unlicensed facility, but is not [a licensed Nursing Home, or other regulated facility as identified in the Act].[ii]

The focus of the Act, is the location of the elder resident, often at home or an unlicensed and unregulated board home or care facility outside the traditional nursing home system. The licensed nursing homes are covered under separate state laws which direct the reporting of elder abuse and neglect, but the residential and home health operations have no such laws, but for the Act which identifies people who are mandated reporters, to the authorities, of elder abuse and neglect at home or in a local residential boarding home, for example.

About mandated reporters and the elder abuse provider agencies

The Act identifies mandated reporters who are subject to legal liability if they fail to report incidents of elder abuse and neglect. These individuals are those who work professionally in the fields of social services, law enforcement, education, elder healthcare, and a list of occupations identified in different state laws regulating healthcare professions.[iii]

In the City of Chicago there are several elder abuse agencies to whom reports of abuse or neglect are made, and in Chicago they are organized by Zip Code. The Cook County list of agencies and those in other Illinois counties are listed in the Elder Abuse and Neglect book.

If one of the listed mandated reporters knows or has good reason to believe abuse or neglect is taking place, they are directed to make contact with a provider agency, meaning “any public or nonprofit agency in a planning and service area appointed by the regional administrative agency with prior approval by the Department on Aging to receive and assess reports of alleged or suspected abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation.[iv]

What can you do if you suspect your loved one is being abused or neglected?

Whether you think you may be a mandated reporter, or you have reason to believe your elderly parent, relative or friend is being abused or neglected, you can certainly contact our health law and litigation firm to talk to an attorney who can tell you more about the reporting procedure and what legal rights if any you may have to take action, if it is necessary to protect the best interests of another in care.

We can also talk to you about your questions about liability if you are a mandated reporter and have questions or concerns about abuse or neglect cases that were reported or should have been reported and but were not reported, or were not reported timely.

Michael V. Favia & Associates, P.C. is a health law and litigation firm in Chicago representing individuals, healthcare professionals and organizations with civil legal matters as well as professional licensing and regulation. We frequently publish information and resources to help healthcare professionals and individual consumers more knowledgeable about news and occurrences in health.

Chicago health law and litigation attorney Michael V. Favia and his associates in several locations and disciplines, advise and represent private individuals as well as healthcare professionals in all types of litigation and administrative matters involving licensing and regulatory agencies.

Michael V. Favia and Associates, P.C. represents individual physicians and health care organizations in the Chicago area with a variety of legal matters. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, call us at (773) 631-4580, please visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You can also review endorsements and recommendations for Michael V. Favia on his Avvo.com profile and on LinkedIn.

 

[i] Illinois Department on Aging, About us

[ii] Elder Abuse and Neglect Act, definitions, 320 ILCS 20/2(a)-(e).

[iii] Elder Abuse and Neglect Act, mandated reporters, 320 ILCS 20/2(f-5).

[iv] Elder Abuse and Neglect Act, provider agency, 320 ILCS 20/2(h).

Image Source: http://www.illinois.gov/aging/Pages/default.aspx

PODCAST: Workers Compensation: Independent medical examinations with Anna Lozoya

The licensing consultants interviewed in this monthly program, previously worked for the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation, and will represent and/or defend licensed professionals in cases involving the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, Illinois Department of Public Aid and Illinois Department of Public Health.

Topics covered in this 30-minute interview – Click/tap here to listen anytime! 

  • Introducing Anna Lozoya, JD, RN, Of Counsel to Michael V. Favia & Associates;
  • Describe the independent medical examination (IME) process in workers compensation;
  • My expertise in reading medical records and IME reports, independently;
  • The importance and value of an objective third party observer;
  • The benefits of having a nurse advocate in the exam room during an IME.

Anna Lozoya, JD, RN, Of Counsel to Michael V. Favia & Associates, works for the firm, on independent medical examination (IME) matters in workers compensation cases. Anna leverages her experience reading medical records and IME reports to help the firm maximize its results for workers compensation plaintiffs. Anna is an attorney and a registered nurse in the State of Illinois and works with a variety of health related legal matters including personal injury, medical malpractice, and regulatory matters with the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation and the Illinois Department of Public Health. In addition, Anna is experienced in real estate law and is bi-lingual Spanish speaker. Anna earned her law degree from the DePaul University where she focused in health law and regulation.

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to advise and represent health care professionals and the general Chicagoland community with a variety of legal issues. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburbs, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion.

For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You may also connect with Attorney Michael V. Favia on LinkedIn and on Avvo.com where you may also read client endorsements and reviews.

Injured at work? Illinois workers’ compensation law and benefits

workers compensation

Michael V. Favia & Associates have helped clients obtain the best possible results in Illinois workers’ compensation cases.

A recent news article highlighted a legal opinion concerning the availability of death benefits under workers compensation laws for the spouse of an employee who dies after suffering a heart attack after engaging in physical labor at work.[i] With several factors contributing to heart conditions, courts must apply the facts to the law and determine whether an event such as a heart attack meets the criteria for workers’ compensation benefits. In most instances, workers’ compensation benefits are paid for actual injuries that are caused, in whole or in part, by the employee’s work.  Workers may also be compensated for aggravation of a pre-existing condition. Injuries are accidental if they happen unexpectedly, without plan or design.  This includes injuries brought on by the repetitive use of a part of the body, as well as strokes, heart attacks or any other physical problem caused by work.[ii]

The Illinois Workers’ Compensation Act

Most employees employed in the State of Illinois are covered by the Illinois Workers’ Compensation Act[iii] ( the “Act”) when they begin employment. Independent contractors, for example, might not be considered employees for purposes of coverage by the Act. If an employee is injured, in whole or in part, from the employee’s work, that employee (or spouse in the event of death) may apply to receive worker’s compensation benefits. The categories of benefits available to eligible employees include medical care; temporary and permanent partial and full disability; vocational rehabilitation and maintenance; and death benefits for surviving family members.

Employees are eligible for workers’ compensation benefits if their injury is a result of work. In the instance of a person suffering a heart attack, it must be proven that the heart attack was partially or wholly caused by the activities performed at their workplace. The cause of a heart attack can be difficult to identify, especially if there are other factors, such as a known heart condition. In the event a claim for workers’ compensation benefits is denied, the applicant has the option of appealing the denial and making their case before an administrative law judge of the Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission (the “Commission”), the state agency that administers the judicial process of resolving disputed benefit claims.

Employees should be aware of their rights under the law and what to do if they are injured at work.

State law requires employers to post legal notices for employees, identifying important workplace laws, including workers’ compensation. The law required employers to provide workers’ compensation insurance or to self-insure when they receive permission to do so from the Commission. The law also protects employees from retaliatory termination as a result of their making an application for workers’ compensation benefits. However, the employer may have a right to change the nature of an employee’s work after an injury. In the case of the individual with a nonfatal heart attack, the employer may reconsider workplace conditions to prevent another heart attack or further injury.

Workplace injuries should be reported to the employer as soon as they are able. Injuries must be reported within 45 days of the event causing injury and within 90 days for injuries sustained in connection with excessive radiation exposure. It is important to notify the employer quickly because a delay could lead to a denial of coverage, especially when time passes and the cause of the employee’s injury may become less clear. In the event a claim for workers’ compensation is denied, the applicant may appeal the denial and proceed in the administrative judicial system.

Michael V. Favia and Associates - Chicago

John Marshall Law School, J.D., 1982; Loyola University, BBA 1978; Assistant Illinois Attorney General; Counsel to the City of Chicago; Former Chief of Medical and Health Related Prosecutions for the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation, directed the statewide enforcement of the Illinois Medical Practice Act and numerous other regulatory and licensure statutes. Selected by peers as a “Leading Lawyer” in the field of Health Law.

The administrative legal process can be complicated and it is smart to use experienced legal counsel.

Chicago health law and litigation attorney, Michael V. Favia and the associate attorneys of Michael V. Favia and Associates, P.C. represent injured workers in the process of applying for and when necessary, litigating workers’ compensation matters before the administrative law judges at the Commission. The workers’ compensation page on the firm’s website has more helpful information.   

With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, please visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You can also review endorsements and recommendations for Michael V. Favia on his Avvo.com profile and on LinkedIn.

[i] The National Law Review, Worker’s Comp: Is Fatal Heart Attack Following Work Exertion Compensable? By Joanna Vilos, Jan. 7, 2016.

[ii] Favia Law Firm, About Workers Compensation in Illinois.

[iii] The Illinois Workers’ Compensation Act, 820 ILCS 305/1 et seq.

Sports physicians adopt new concussion protocols to avoid medical malpractice liability

Image Source, Medical Daily: Health Care In The NFL: Are Football Players' Medical Needs Being Met? bit.ly/1RcAp3d

Image Source, Medical Daily: Health Care In The NFL: Are Football Players’ Medical Needs Being Met? bit.ly/1RcAp3d

Traumatic brain injuries are increasingly known to lead to significant long-term damages to athletes. The NFL concussion lawsuits highlighted the need for research, awareness and new protocols to reduce and prevent the incidence of brain trauma. The medical community, in connection with the legal and media communities, is developing new protocols and medical standards for the prevention and treatment of concussions. Sports medicine professionals leading safety and treatment initiatives are helping physicians better treat brain injury patients and as new protocols are adopted, the standards for medical practice and malpractice are changing. To avoid negligence claims, sports and general physicians are adapting to the new standards for care and treatment of concussion patients, on and off the field.

Sports medicine generally includes athletic team doctors and trainers who can now conduct baseline testing for athletes to better measure concussion symptoms. Medical professionals also use new and better protocols and treatment plans to ensure their patients are recovered from and at decreased risk of future problems in connection with head trauma. If concussion symptoms and ailments are not properly managed, the long-term results to the injured can include permanent physical and mental damage, leading to death in some cases, as the world witnessed with the untimely suicides of well-known former professional athletes.[i]

Physicians have a legal duty to practice medicine by the standards set in the local medical community.

No physicians want to receive a medical malpractice claim or be listed as a named defendant in a civil lawsuit for money damages. Insurance rates can rise, state medical licensing boards can get involved, and a career and reputation can suffer from a medical malpractice case.

Physicians are held to a legal duty to practice medicine with a standard of care established in their medical community. Doctors in major cities like Chicago, with access to the best research, facilities and staff have a different standard of care than a doctor practicing medicine in a small rural area with less available resources. The standard of care is also a function of specialty practice areas. While sports medicine is not a specifically recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties, a doctor who treats athletes can be held to the same standard as like-kind doctors routinely treating athlete patients.

Adopting new protocols and standards of care are necessary to prevent medical negligence and malpractice claims.

A plaintiff’s attorney suing a doctor for malpractice will likely assert the highest possible standards of care and argue that the doctor failed to meet their legal duty to render healthcare services consistent with that highest standard of care. For example, if a doctor practices sports medicine, they are expected to adopt and use the latest and best protocols for treating concussion victims. Plaintiff attorneys use investigators and experts who testify in court to sway a jury to adopt and apply the standards of care to the doctor on trial, arguing the doctor failed to meet their legal duty to meet those standards.

The defense attorney’s position is to argue that the doctor accused of malpractice, did indeed practice medicine to the standards required of them in their local medical community. The prevalence of new protocols for the treatment of brain injuries, for example, might be new and complex, and not yet adopted across the board in the local area in which the defendant physician practices. As new protocols and standards for medical care are published in medical journals and as they become the subject of lectures and continuing education, they become more accepted in the determination of what the doctor’s standard of care and duty to practice.

Michael V. Favia and the Illinois Professional Licensing Consultants work with physicians and the prosecution and defense of various legal matters including malpractice, licensing and regulation.

With many years of experience in health law and litigation, Michael V. Favia is a sought after lawyer asked frequently to co-counsel on both sides of medical malpractice suits, for both prosecution and defense of those claims. A major consideration for any physician facing a medical malpractice claim is the potential for ancillary problems in the event a case is settled or resolved against the doctor’s interests. For example, a medical malpractice settlement, which will be reported to the National Practitioner Databank, can lead to state medical board investigations and physician discipline.

Insofar as traumatic brain injuries are concerned, physicians who practice medicine and work with concussion patients are well advised to seek and find the research and findings associated with new brain injury treatment and protocols for care, as they may be held to a high standard.

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to advise and represent physicians with a variety of legal issues. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburbs, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.

[i] PBS, New: 87 Deceased NFL Players Test Positive for Brain Disease, by Jason Breslow, Sept. 18, 2015. “87 out of 91 former NFL players have tested positive for the brain disease at the center of the debate over concussions in football, according to new figures from the nation’s largest brain bank focused on the study of traumatic head injury.”

On-duty emergency physicians are liable for damages despite the Good Samaritan Act

"To identify the most overlooked risks to physicians, Medical Economics asked several thought leaders to share their insight into strategies for protecting office-based practices."

In Illinois, the Good Samaritan Act protects individuals giving instructions for aid, or rendering aid to others in emergencies, from civil liability for damages resulting in the process. Simply stated, a bystander or passerby who sees someone with an injury or emergency condition does not have a legal duty to stop and give general or medical aid. Moreover, a passerby who stops to assist and render some type of aid, cannot be sued and found liable for civil damages if the endangered individual suffers and injury or dies in the process. The purpose of the Good Samaritan Act is to allow people to try to save a choking victim without worrying about a wrongful death suit if they are not successful.

The Good Samaritan Act includes a physician exemption from civil liability for emergency care. The statute states in pertinent part: “Any person licensed under the Medical Practice Act of 1987 or any person licensed to practice the treatment of human ailments in any other state or territory of the United States who, in good faith, provides emergency care without fee to a person, shall not, as a result of his or her acts or omissions, except willful or wanton misconduct on the part of the person, in providing the care, be liable for civil damages.[i]

While the language of the statute is clear, there question has arisen, what happens when the emergency care physician is not providing health care for a direct fee, but rather works as an on-duty physician.

The Illinois Supreme Court holds that the Good Samaritan Act does not shield on-duty physicians who do not bill for their services, and on-duty physicians have the same standard of care regardless of whether they bill for their services. The issue arose in a case involving an on-duty emergency room physician, responding to a “code blue” for a patient with trouble breathing and swallowing. The doctor intubated the patient and opened the airway, and nevertheless the patient experienced permanent brain damage.[ii] The doctor working as an emergency room physician when the “code blue” was called for a patient on another floor of the hospital, whom the doctor had never previously met or treated.

The First District Illinois Appellate Court held in the case, the emergency room physician responding to the “code blue” for a hospital patient, the immunity from liability under the Good Samaritan Act did not apply because the doctor’s services were not performed “without fee” where the doctor was paid to work in the emergency room.[iii]

If the facts had been different, this court could have applied the Good Samaritan Act. Assume a different set of facts where the doctor was not on-duty, working as an emergency physician at the time he responded to the “code blue” for the patient on another floor, separate from the emergency room. Assume the same treatment was given, the doctor intubated the patient, who experienced permanent brain damage, there would have been a more likely chance the doctor may have been able to be clear of civil liability under the Good Samaritan Act.

As new events and occurrences give rise to litigation over health care liability, the courts will decide those cases and the health care law and litigation firm of Michael V. Favia and Associates will share those holdings.

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to assist with analysis and advice on all aspects of physician practice and litigation matters. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.

 

[i] Illinois Good Samaritan Act, Sec. 25 Physicians, 745 ILCS 49/25

[ii] Beckers Hospital Review, Illinois Supreme Court: Good Samaritan Act Doesn’t Shield On-Duty Emergency Physicians, by Ayla Ellison, Apr. 29, 2014.

[iii] Home Star Bank & Financial Services v. Emergency Care & Health Organization, Ltd., 2012 IL App (1st) 112321