Category Archives: Consumer and Financial Fruad

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Responsibility investigates cases that can lead to discipline.

Medicare fraud bust in Illinois leads to 6 and ½ year sentence

The biggest problem facing Medicare fraud might be the arrogance of people who get away with bad acts for too long. Meanwhile, with the cooperation of law enforcement agencies using technology and skill, fraud schemes are frequently shut down and bad actors are prosecuted. In some cases, someone on the inside is the whistleblower who notifies authorities. In this case, the nurses who challenged fraudulent behavior were treated poorly and terminated. Several former employees filed whistleblower lawsuits leading to the investigation, arrest and prosecutions in this major Medicare fraud case.

The $90 million Medicare fraud scheme

In this case, Seth Gillman, Chicago businessman and mastermind of this fraud scheme exploited terminally ill patients in Illinois in the $20 million Medicare fraud. Gillman was convicted and sentenced to 6 ½ years in federal prison.

The Chicago Tribune reports, “By paying kickbacks to nursing homes and giving bonuses to employees who took part in the fraud, Gillman built his Passages Hospice LLC into the largest such company in Illinois, serving terminally ill patients in 89 countries and billing Medicare more than $90 million from 2008-2012, government records show.[i]

Unfortunately, Passages Hospice did not provide the care consistent with what Medicare paid in claims submitted for patient services. Meanwhile, Gillman lived a lavish lifestyle, excessive even for a licensed attorney and nursing home administrator. To the U.S. District Court Judge, Gillman stated, “I betrayed the trust of Medicare and I besmirched the integrity of hospice all together…I was stupid and I was wrong.[ii]

Investigation and discovery of Medicare fraud schemes

Why would anyone want to be the whistleblower? When an individual with “clean hands” contacts and works with the investigation of Medicare fraud schemes, they may be removing themselves from the eye of the investigators. Since many of the common Medicare fraud schemes are complex, there are multiple people involved. Therefore, investigators might be looking at everyone involved in a healthcare operation, when there is a suggestion of wrongdoing. It may be easier to report the fraud than be accused of being a part of it or helping with a cover-up.

Another reason people report fraud is they may be able to recover a percentage of fines assessed and paid in connection with the Medicare fraud prosecution.  This is called Qui Tam and our article on point explains the process. See Dr. Whistleblower: Reporting $10 million in a Medicare billing fraud scheme, could share in recovery.

If you or another suspect there may be wrongdoing occurring in a health-related practice or care facility, it is a good idea to talk to a health law and litigation lawyer to figure out where you may stand in the event there is a current or pending investigation. You might also be a proper person to file a whistleblower lawsuit. You might also be an individual responsible for others below you who you believe may be engaged in wrongdoing. Likewise, it is imperative to secure experienced legal counsel.

About us: Michael V. Favia & Associates, P.C. is a health law and litigation firm in Chicago representing individuals, healthcare professionals and organizations with civil legal matters as well as professional licensing and regulation.

Chicago health law and litigation attorney Michael V. Favia and his associates in several locations and disciplines, advise and represent private individuals as well as healthcare professionals in all types of litigation and administrative matters involving licensing and regulatory agencies.

Michael V. Favia and Associates, P.C. represents individual physicians and health care organizations in the Chicago area with a variety of legal matters. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. Michael V. Favia & Associates is available at (773) 631-4580. Please visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You can also review endorsements and recommendations for Michael V. Favia on his Avvo.com profile and on LinkedIn.

 

[i] Chicago Tribune, Hospice CEO gets 6 ½ years for fraud scheme, by David Jackson and Gary Marx, Mar. 7, 2017.

[ii] See HNi above.

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Rock Island, Illinois home health supplier faces vendor fraud charges for submitting false billing invoices.

How you can stop home health fraud, Whistleblowers may share in recovery

Home health companies are increasingly popular among families who want their loved one to receive care in their own home or another residential location with others receiving care. Home health options are appealing to those who do not favor the traditional nursing home facilities and find them to seem institutional. One advantage of a traditional nursing home setting may be the close monitoring and control of the healthcare professionals who work with residents. Too often the news reports include stories of home health operations failing their residents and failing the system. There are cases of negligent care and abuse of home health residents as well as cases of fraud and financial deceit. When individuals are tempted by the chance to get a little extra from the government, that little extra tends to become more. Many caught in home health fraud schemes are able to take significant amounts of money before they are stopped. How would you know your loved one was cared for by individuals engaging in home health fraud? What questions about the quality of care would keep you up at night?

Is there a way to know whether home health care givers are honest and trustworthy?

When choosing in home healthcare options, it is important to do your research and conduct due diligence by investigating the backgrounds of the individuals who may be caring for you or your loved one. For less than 100 dollars you can obtain background investigative reports for home health professionals. Professional licenses can be verified and in the process, any reports of discipline of that professional may be available. If you are not comfortable or particularly skilled at online investigation, our law firm can assist you or recommend another who may be better able to help you in the vetting process. Unfortunately, it may be difficult to tell whether the individual of any character is engaged in or connected to a fraudulent operation.

Medicare billing fraud cases are reported frequently and investigations lead to convictions.

When people picture Medicare fraud, the image may be a dark basement with leaking pipes and a crooked looking person working at a desk with a sinister look and laugh. In reality, the setting may be right outside your window or down the street. The suburban landscape is ripe with reports of home health fraud. In Schaumburg, Illinois, a 47 year-old woman was convicted on 21 counts of fraud and making false statements; and sentenced to 72 months, with an order to pay 15.6 million dollars in restitution. “Home-health fraud has become a significant problem nationally and particularly in the Chicago area,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Chahn Lee argued in the government’s sentencing memorandum. “Such fraud cannot happen without people like the defendant, who abuse Medicare’s rules and abuse the trust placed in them by Medicare and their patients.[i]

Examples of Medicare billing fraud.

In this recent fraud case in Schaumburg, the woman leading the fraud directed her employees to conduct in-home visits for patients who did not need care, people who were not home-bound and quite able and otherwise healthy. When the employees billed Medicare for the visits, they billed for the more expensive and complicated levels of care, even though no care was needed or often performed. The inflated billing and billing for services not needed is an easy fraud to hide if nobody is looking.

Billing Medicare for services not actually needed or performed is such big business that some fraud operations offer kickbacks to individuals who recruit and sign up new home health patients, regardless of their health condition, so long as they qualify for Medicare services and a bill for something can be generated.

How do the frauds become exposed, investigated and stopped if nobody is looking?

Whistleblowers lead to investigations and convictions for home health fraud where Medicare is duped into paying for services never needed or rendered. If one of the nurses working for the woman leading up the Schaumburg fraud scheme was the whistleblower and reported the fraud to authorities, that person would be paid a part of the restitution ordered, in this case that would be a cut of the more than 15-million-dollar restitution.

If you or someone you know suspects others are profiting from home health fraud, you can contact our law firm by dialing 773-631-4580 to learn about your rights under the law and whether you may be able to stop a home health operation engaging in fraudulent practices.

Michael V. Favia & Associates, P.C. is a health law and litigation firm in Chicago representing individuals, healthcare professionals and organizations with civil legal matters as well as professional licensing and regulation. We frequently publish information and resources to help healthcare professionals and individual consumers more knowledgeable about news and occurrences in health.

Chicago health law and litigation attorney Michael V. Favia and his associates in several locations and disciplines, advise and represent private individuals as well as healthcare professionals in all types of litigation and administrative matters involving licensing and regulatory agencies.

Michael V. Favia and Associates, P.C. represents individual physicians and health care organizations in the Chicago area with a variety of legal matters. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, call us at (773) 631-4580, please visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You can also review endorsements and recommendations for Michael V. Favia on his Avvo.com profile and on LinkedIn.

 

[i] eNews Park Forest, Head of Schaumburg Home Health Company Sentenced to Six Years for Scheming to Fraudulently Bill Medicare for Unnecessary Care, Chicago ENEWSPF, July 26, 2016.

PODCAST: Criminal Healthcare Fraud and Defense with Attorney Anthony Schumann

This podcast interview with Anthony Schumann focuses on current trends and topics in the area of criminal healthcare fraud and defense. In the next 30 minutes we will cover everything from how to be proactive in your practice and limit your liability, to what steps to take if you are audited, investigated or charged with a crime.

CLICK/TAP HERE TO LISTEN NOW

Topics covered in this 30-minute interview 

  • Introducing Anthony Schumann, tell us about your law practice
  • Sources of criminal healthcare law, state and federal
  • Enforcement areas: home health, kickbacks, mental health, drug diversion, etc.
  • What to expect during investigations and when to obtain legal defense counsel
  • Professional licensing concerns in connection with dispositions of cases
  • What to expect in defending criminal healthcare fraud charges

Anthony L. Schumann is a partner in the Chicago office of Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A.  For more than 30 years, Mr. Schumann has participated in over 150 civil and criminal trials and evidentiary hearings.  He focuses his practice in the areas of commercial litigation, employment law, government liability, and white collar criminal defense.  He has extensive experience representing corporate, governmental and individual clients in state and federal courts and during all stages of investigation and throughout the litigation process.  Mr. Schumann has extensive experience assisting companies with internal investigations and in handling compliance issues.  He has attained an AV® rating from Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory, the highest professional rating awarded for legal ability and ethical standards; and he is also included in the listings of Illinois Leading Lawyer and Illinois Super Lawyer.

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Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to advise and represent health care professionals and the general Chicagoland community with a variety of legal issues. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburbs, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion.

For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please call (773) 631-4580, visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You may also connect with Attorney Michael V. Favia on LinkedIn and on Avvo.com where you may also read client endorsements and reviews.

Illinois physicians and healthcare professionals: Are you prepared in the event of an OIG audit or review?

Not only do healthcare providers need to be concerned with federal compliance with government funded benefit programs like Medicare, there are state compliance agencies who oversee and audit physicians and healthcare systems to make sure there are no shortcomings in the state-funded benefit systems. In Illinois, the Office of the Inspector General (“OIG”) operates as a division of the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services. The OIG’s stated mission is, “to prevent, detect and eliminate fraud, waste, abuse, misconduct and mismanagement in programs administered by Healthcare and Family Services and the Department of Human Services.[i]” The OIG focuses its efforts in fraud prevention, investigations, audits and reviews, sanctions and restrictions, and safety and security.

The OIG in Illinois is highly focused on preventing fraud on the Illinois Medicaid Program and it uses advanced technologies and methods to detect and track activities that could be fraudulent. When possible the OIG conducts preventative verifications of the people and systems involved in tracking medical equipment, the prescribing and delivery of medications and healthcare services.

Illinois Medicaid Fraud Investigations

Fraud can stem from many sources including public aid recipients as well as employees and healthcare service contractors. When a report is made that fraudulent activity may be occurring, the OIG is tasked with investigations to determine if a fraud is being perpetrated on the system. The OIG works closely with a variety of state agencies and authorities to investigate and stop fraud. When an investigation produces significant proof of fraudulent conduct the proper agencies may arrest and bring criminal charges against any individuals involved in defrauding the state.

Audits and Reviews in the Illinois Medicaid Program

In addition to investigating suspected fraud cases, the OIG also conducts a variety of audits and reviews of the Illinois Medicaid System:

  1. Post-payment compliance audits – are all the payments made to Medicaid providers identified and proper?
  2. Quality of care reviews – are proper healthcare services being performed for patients who rely on state funded Medicaid and related programs?
  3. Eligibility reviews – are the people receiving Illinois Medicaid eligible within the system requirements?

What to do if you receive notice of an audit or review by the OIG

In the event the OIG notifies you that they are planning an audit or a review of your healthcare practice, policies and procedures in connection with the application or receipt of reimbursements from Illinois Medicaid or any other program under the authority of the OIG, it is important to immediately contact a healthcare attorney to make sure you are properly organized and prepared to cooperate with the audit or review.

While there may be advanced notice or warning of an audit or review, in cases where a fraud report has been filed with the OIG and they have already been investigating the complaint in the background, the audit might be less routine and more of an evidence gathering exercise. The advice to call a lawyer still applies, and moreover, talking to a lawyer before there is any reason to worry about an audit is a good idea. Just as you maintain a malpractice policy and never plan to use it, maintaining a plan of action in the event of an OIG audit is a prudent move for any healthcare provider.

Michael V. Favia is an experienced healthcare attorney who worked for the State of Illinois and knows first-hand how state investigations and prosecutions proceed and how to properly cooperate.

The former Chief of Prosecutions for the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation, now known as the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulations (“IDFPR”), Michael V. Favia advises and represents healthcare professionals and organizations in a variety of matters, including routine, and not-so-routine audits, reviews and investigations. Favia knows the state regulatory schema and system and can help healthcare professionals craft a plan and be prepared in the event the OIG or another agency comes knocking at their office door.

Chicago health law and litigation attorney Michael V. Favia and his associates in several locations and disciplines, advise and represent licensed physicians in all types of litigation and administrative matters involving licensing and regulatory agencies.

Michael V. Favia and Associates, P.C. represents individual physicians and health care organizations in the Chicago area with a variety of legal matters. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, please call (773) 631-4850, visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You can also review endorsements and recommendations for Michael V. Favia on his Avvo.com profile and on LinkedIn.

 

[i] IL Dept. of Health and Family Services, Office of the Inspector General, mission.

PODCAST: Spotting identity theft and taking action with Roger Zamparo

The Illinois Professional Licensing Consultants is a group of highly experienced attorneys and investigators who represent and defend licensed professionals.  The Illinois Professional Licensing Consultants have a network of connections with attorneys and professionals who manage a variety of legal practice areas including consumer protection. Zamparo Law Group defends consumers from deceptive and unfair business practices, abusive collection tactics, identity theft, and a host of other anti-consumer behaviors.

Topics covered in this podcast interviewclick here to listen now!

  • How do identity thieves operate and what do they do with your information?
  • What are some of the new ways thieves use technology to steal identities?
  • How much damage can identity theft cause, in addition to credit problems?
  • What legal remedies are available to credit theft victims and how does it work?
  • If we learn identity theft happens when it is too late, how can we be safe?
Roger Zamparo, Zamparo Law Group, P.C., Chicago Consumer Protection Litigation Law Firm.

Roger Zamparo, Zamparo Law Group, P.C.

Roger Zamparo received a B.A. from Ohio University and his J.D. from The John Marshall Law School (where he is currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees). In his 35-year litigation practice, he has represented individuals and corporations in both state and federal courts. He has concentrated on several areas, including consumer law and legal malpractice. Please contact the Illinois Professional Licensing Consultants at (773) 631-4580 to be connected with Roger Zamparo if you have a consumer protection question or need to consult on your legal matter.

 

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to advise and represent health care professionals and the general Chicagoland community with a variety of legal issues. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburbs, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. Illinois Professional Licensing Consultants 6

For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You may also connect with Attorney Michael V. Favia on LinkedIn and on Avvo.com where you may also read client endorsements and reviews.

Dr. Whistleblower: Reporting $10 million in a Medicare billing fraud scheme, could share in recovery

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Responsibility investigates cases that can lead to discipline.

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Responsibility investigates cases that can lead to discipline.

Former CEO of a physician-hospital practice venture, Robert Dannenhoffer, MD, filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging his former employer terminated the doctor’s position in retaliation for Dannenhoffer reporting a $10 million Medicare fraud scheme. Dr. Dannenhoffer led investigators to discover a fraudulent payment scheme, by which doctors were being compensated more money in exchange for prescribing certain medical procedures and prescription medications to Medicare patients, regardless of whether they were necessary, according to reports. The lawsuit alleges violations of the False Claims Act and the Stark Act, a federal patient referral law. As a whistleblower under federal law, Dr. Dannenhoffer seeks and may be entitled to the reinstatement of his position, back pay, punitive damages and attorney’s fees.[i]

Medicare Fraud is often reported and exposed by whistleblowers who may share in court awards.

Medicare fraud costs U.S. taxpayers significant money every year when fraudulent reimbursements and overpayments are claimed and paid for treatments never provided to patients, suppliers billing for equipment never obtained and even the use of false information to mislead an individual to joining a Medicare plan. Doctors in physician-hospital practice ventures, like Dr. Dannenhoffer, may be liable for Medicare fraud occurring in their practice, even despite their potential lack of personal knowledge. By reporting the suspected fraudulent behavior as a whistleblower, a physician like Dr. Dannenhoffer not only may avoid liability for fraud, they may recover a percentage of any amounts for which the case settles or for which a judge rules in favor of the government.

Dr. Dannenhoffer is the whistleblower in this Medicare fraud scheme in which over $10 million worth of fraudulent and inflated Medicare payments are identified. The doctor claims that after he filed his federal whistleblower lawsuit, he was fired as CEO of the major healthcare provider where he worked and was blacklisted in the medical community.

The doctor claims his healthcare company violated the False Claims Act and the Stark Act.

False Claims Act violations are not taken lightly. In this case, Halifax Health settled for $85M.

False Claims Act violations are not taken lightly. In this case, Halifax Health settled for $85M.

Federal law codified in the False Claims Act (FCA)[ii] imposes liability on individuals and organizations, often federal contractors, who defraud government programs such as Medicare. The FCA, imposes damages and penalties for any individual who knowingly submits or causes another to submit a false claim to the government, or knowingly makes a false record or statement to obtain a false claim paid by the government. The current amounts of penalties can amount to three times the dollar amount of the claim plus fines of $5,500 – $11,000 per claim.

An individual reporting Medicare fraud may also file an intervening lawsuit on behalf of the government, a qui tam action, and the whistleblower’s identity is kept under seal. The whistleblower may share in the financial settlement or recovery, between 15 and 25 percent of the amount. The law works this way to encourage more individuals to step forward and report Medicare fraud.

The Stark Law[iii] is a section of the Social Security Act and is known as the physician self-referral law. Physicians may not make referrals and receive payment Designated Health Services[iv] payable by Medicare to an individual or group where the physician or their immediate family member are an owner or have an ownership interest. In this case, Dr. Dannenhoffer was not allowed to make referrals to the organized medical service venture in which he was a partner with interest.

Being a whistleblower has its costs, but it is better to discover and report Medicare violations, than to worry about civil and criminal liability for participating or failing to report fraud.

The laws involving fraud are frequently tightening and are stricter in the enforcement of the False Claims Act.

The laws involving fraud are frequently tightening and are stricter in the enforcement of the False Claims Act.

Michael V. Favia and Associates can help physicians who learn or receive notice of Medicare fraud activities. With many local, state and federal agencies working together to investigate and stop health care billing fraud, reporting a violation as a whistleblower may be the only option an individual has when they otherwise could face civil and criminal liability and penalties, including imprisonment. Of course, Favia and his team can also offer physicians a review of their billing procedures and protocols to assess risk and exposure to potential fraud. When your chain is only as strong as its weakest link, it makes sense to regularly examine that chain.

Chicago health law, litigation and professional licensing attorney, Michael V. Favia and the associate attorneys of Michael V. Favia and Associates, P.C. represent individual physicians and health care organizations in the Chicago area with a variety of legal matters. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburban meeting locations, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates, please visit www.favialawfirm.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter. You can also review endorsements and recommendations for Michael V. Favia on his Avvo.com profile and on LinkedIn.

[i] Beckers Hospital Review, Ex-CEO claims retaliation for blowing the whistle on $10M in false Medicare charges, by Ayla Ellison, Jan. 27, 2016.

[ii] The False Claims Act 31 U.S.C. §§ 3729–3733

[iii] The Stark Act 42 U.S.C. § 1395nn

[iv] Designated Health Services under the Stark Law

Home health care fraud in Bloomingdale, bogus certifications lead to jail time

home health care fraud

Image courtesy of Chicago Sun-Times, Bloomingdale doctor gets two years for Medicare fraud http://bit.ly/1J7HUWX

Home health care facilities can be hotbeds for fraud and prosecutors with their investigators recently put another fraud case in the news. The Bloomingdale-based Home Care Physicians Inc., part-owner and employee, Dr. Arthur Davida, 62, pleaded guilty and received a 2-year sentence in connection with home health care fraud. Physicians engaging in fraudulent activities are not only subject to criminal and civil penalties, they also face discipline by the Illinois Medical Board as well as licensing agencies in any other state in which they are now or in the future wish to practice medicine. While it may be possible to rehabilitate a the career of a convicted physician, it would certainly be an uphill battle.

The increase in popularity of home health care facilities can cause concern for many.

In recent years, home health care has become a well-known and more affordable alternative to traditional nursing and care facilities. Concerns about care and the well-being of their loved ones in nursing facilities make it an easier choice for many families to engage the services of cost-effective home health care operations so their loved ones can stay in their own homes or reside in a home health care residence with one or two other individuals in need of care. Unfortunately, the concerns for proper care and attention are present in home health care situations, just as they are in traditional nursing care facilities. Through increased awareness of the risks and problems in home health care, more family members become aware of situations in which their loved ones could be used as pawns in a fraudulent operation.

In this case, the suburban doctor was alleged to be part of a fraud scheme in with home health agencies who provided patient referrals in exchange for certifications that the patients were confined to homes and not physically or mentally fit to come and go on their own volition. During the course of the investigation by the Medicare Fraud Strike Force, prosecutors from the office of the U.S. Attorney General and the Fraud Section of the U.S. Department of Justice, it was determined that 20 percent of the patients were not confined to their homes. The home health agencies relied on the doctor’s certification that the patients were homebound so that the agencies could bill Medicare for home health care and treatment that those 20 percent of patients did not need. Additionally, the investigation uncovered evidence of billing for unnecessary medical treatments.

Investigators and prosecutors are vigilant in identifying and stopping Medicare fraud.

The cost to Medicare and taxpayers in this case alone totaled at least $4 million according to prosecutors in this case. Imposing the 2 year sentence, U.S. District Court Judge John Tharp, Jr. said this crime is a “very serious offense” involving “stealing money” from Medicare.[i]

The Medicare Fraud Strike Force, overseen by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Officer of Inspector General, established in 2007, combines efforts of the Office of Inspector General, the U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Attorneys offices, the FBI, private investigators and local law enforcement. Teams of professionals review data and intelligence to identify and stop individuals abusing the Medicare system, bringing them to justice.

This case is relatively recent and as of the date of this blog article, Dr. Arthur Davida is still listed as having a valid medical license in the State of Illinois. Anyone can search for a physician profile on the website of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR). A conviction of a crime routinely causes an investigation of a licensed professional, and the due process of law takes considerable time. It is unknown what will happen to this physician’s license to practice medicine in Illinois and other states. According to prosecutors, in his plea agreement the doctor in this case acquiesced to providing the fraudulent certifications for fear the agencies would stop sending referrals.[ii] Cooperation with authorities and prosecutors can make a difference not only in sentencing but in also concerning a professional license.

Chicago health law and litigation attorney, Michael V. Favia, represents Illinois physicians.

Michael V. Favia has a career in law working as a prosecutor and a defender in health care law and litigation. In addition, Favia’s past and current work with the IDFPR touches every element of this case and a variety of fraud-based cases involving Medicare billing for health care services. To learn more about attorney Favia, you may review his professional profile.

Michael V. Favia & Associates are available to advise and represent physicians with a variety of legal issues. With offices conveniently located in the Chicago Loop, Northwest side and suburbs, you can schedule a discrete meeting with an attorney at your convenience and discretion. For more about Michael V. Favia & Associates’ professional licensing work, please visit www.IL-Licensing.com and feel free to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” the firm on Twitter.

 

[i] Chicago SunTimes, Bloomingdale doctor gets two years for Medicare fraud, by Sun-Times Wire, Jan 7, 2016.

[ii] See HNi above.