Interview on Chicago Concussion Coalition and Sports Legacy Institute

Established in 2011, the Chicago Concussion Coalition (CCC) represents a network of 50 national athletic, health and social service organizations united under a common mission  to work in partnership with coalition members to provide student athletes in greater Chicago with the best resources available reto protect them from sports related concussions and recurring injuries.

Established in 2011, the Chicago Concussion Coalition (CCC) represents a network of 50 national athletic, health and social service organizations united under a common mission to work in partnership with coalition members to provide student athletes in greater Chicago with the best resources available reto protect them from sports related concussions and recurring injuries.

Do you know someone who plays contact sports such as football, hockey, soccer or baseball? How about someone who cheers for the team? Maybe you also know a veteran of U.S. military service. Ok, what do you think all these people have in common? They are the focus of traumatic brain injury / concussion research, education and policy change, by the Sports Legacy Institute (“SLI”) and the Chicago Concussion Coalition. Earlier this week Michael V. Favia appeared along with Ms. Caitlin McElroy, Field Associate, for the Sports Legacy Institute in Chicago, to share information about SLI and its mission, activities and various avenues for interested professionals to get involved.

Click/tap here to listen to an on demand broadcast of the interview on Law Talk Radio.

The mission of the Sports Legacy Institute is to advance the study, treatment and prevention of the effects of brain trauma in athletes and other at-risk groups. Highlights of the interview include a further detailed explanation of the SLI’s mission and the foundation of the organization by Christopher Nowinski and Dr. Robert Cantu. They founded SLI as a Boston-based 501(c)(3) in 2007 in response to new research and increased attention to traumatic brain injuries and the need for more research, education and to affect policy change.

Do remember playing sports as a kid, many years ago, and getting hit in the head? Many little league coaches, for example, were known for saying, “Hey, get up and walk it off and take your base.” Then, days later little Tommy’s facial expressions seemed a bit off and droopy and he started mixing up his words. Nowadays, some people think we are overly cautious about concussions. As more research is reported, the scariest thing doctors conclude is that we have only barely scratched the surface in knowing what we are dealing with in terms of cognitive impairment post trauma.

NFL lawsuits brought concussion/traumatic brain injuries to dinner table discussions nationwide.

When several former NFL players filed suit against numerous defendants for permanent injuries due to concussions during games, a few helmet manufacturers responded with efforts at creating high-tech safety helmets, which is a good thing. What people should remember is that helmets can help soften impacts and protect the skull, but the brain is floating in fluid and those impacts can still create grave danger to players.

Many advocacy groups also focus their attention on cheerleading safety and military service members who suffer from traumatic brain injury. Also discussed in the above-linked interview are current trends in concussion research, and how SLI and the Chicago Concussion Coalition are engaging community groups, schools and teams to share vital information. Attorney Michael V. Favia noted that injury attorneys looking for concussion experts should certainly learn more and be in touch with SLI’s Chicago Concussion Coalition to learn more.

The Law Offices of Michael V. Favia advise and represent clients in connection with concussions/traumatic brain injury. To contact the firm to speak to a lawyer you may dial (773) 631-4580. For more information about the firm’s practice areas, you can visit the website, Facebook and Twitter sites.

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